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Hybrid Syllabus



BC 306
Ethics: Theory and Practice


Course developed by: Robert Ellmann, B.A., M.Phil., JuDr.

5 Credit Hours
3 in classroom, 2 online
Effective: August, 2008










Required Resources

Thiroux, J. P., & Krasemann, K. W. (2007). Ethics: Theory and practice (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

Hult, C. A., & Huckin, T. N. (2008). The brief new century handbook (4th ed.). New York: Pearson/Longman -- packaged with Strunk & White style booklet.
Access to a personal computer and the Internet is required. All written assignments must be word-processed and spell-checked.


Copyright 1993-2008 by City University of Seattle
All rights reserved
BC 306
Ethics: Theory and Practice

This document provides an overview of the course foundation elements, assignments, schedules, and activities. For information about general City University of Seattle policies, please see the City University of Seattle catalog. If you have additional questions about the course, please contact your instructor.

Notification to Students with Disabilities
If you are a student with a disability and you require an accommodation, please contact the Disability Resource Office at 1.800.426.5596 ext. 5228 as soon as possible.

Scholastic Honesty

Students are responsible for understanding City University of Seattle’s policy on Scholastic Honesty and are required to adhere to its standards in meeting all course requirements. Violations of the policy include, among other practices:
1. Cheating;
2. Plagiarizing;
3. Submitting substantially the same work for two different courses without prior permission from the instructors;
4. Collaborating on assignments without prior permission of the instructor;
5. Submitting papers written wholly or partly by someone else;
6. Helping someone else commit an act of scholastic dishonesty.

Common violations are copying from someone else’s test paper, using unauthorized books or notes during a test, and using previously published material without clear citations to identify the source. Cases of suspected scholastic dishonesty are referred to the university Scholastic Honesty Committee, which can apply a variety of penalties ranging in severity, including assigning a zero grade for the course, suspension, and dismissal from the university. In cases of suspected scholastic dishonesty, a paper may be submitted to an online service that checks the content of the paper against a database of source material. The submitted paper may be added to a permanent archive.

For more complete information, students should read the section on Scholastic Honesty (under the heading of Student Rights and Responsibilities) in the university catalog, available in print or online at http://www.cityu.edu. When in doubt about applications to a particular course or situation, students should ask the instructor for guidance.

Course Description
An overview of various philosophical approaches to ethical decision-making and practical applications involving ethical problems that arise in contemporary society, such as crime and punishment, marriage and the family, the environment, love and sexuality, civil society and the state.

There are many approaches to ethics – philosophical, legal, political, historical, environmental, gender, and so on – while there is little agreement between these approaches; therefore, this class will pose many questions, in keeping with Socrates’ admonition to concentrate on the questions rather than on the answers, and will concentrate on exploring the ethical universes created in the writings of great thinkers.
Learning Goals
Upon the successful completion of this course, you will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast various approaches – philosophical, legal, political, environmental -- to ethical decision-making;
2. Assess the value of ethical inquiry itself;
3. Analyze the relationships between punishments, rewards, and ethics;
4. Discuss the issues involved in living a good life;
5. Apply ethical analysis to contemporary social problems.

Core Concepts

To achieve the goals of this course, students will read, consider and discuss the following texts, particularly in consideration of the ‘ethical universes’ each writer has created and the meanings attached and implied in each of them:
1. Anti-philosophical text: Thus spoke Zarathustra by Nietzsche;
2. ‘Non-complex society’ text: The Politics;
3. Political texts: Locke’s Second Treatise and Rousseau’s Discourse on Inequality;
4. ‘Complex society’ text: Hegel’s Philosophy of Right;
5. Anti-revolutionary text: Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France;
6. Legal text: the court decision in Heath v. Alabama, 474 U.S. 82;
7. Medical issues in the court decision in Barber 147 Cal. App. 3d 1006;
8. Environmental and business issues using Keynes, and McDonald’s and Enron case studies;
9. Love, sexuality and intimacy issues using Kinsey, Beck (via a secondary source) and others.
Recommended Supplementary Resources

As a City University of Seattle student, you have access to library resources regardless of where and how you are taking this class. To access the resources that are necessary to complete your coursework and assignments, visit the library menu in the My.CityU portal at http://my.cityu.edu.

A good place to begin your research is through the program or course resource sections that provide links to relevant journals, books, and Web sites. Search the library's online catalog to locate books and videos, and place requests to have items mailed to you (services vary by location). Search the online databases for journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Articles that are not available full text in the library's collection can be requested from other libraries and delivered to you electronically.

For additional help, submit your question via the Ask a Librarian e-mail service available through the portal or call 800.526.4269 (U.S. or Canada) or 425.709.3444.

Electronic Resources

Consult your instructor if you have questions about electronic resources regarding specific aspects of the course, while you may also use the following resources.

American Philosophical Association Home Page
http://www.udel.edu/apa

City University of Seattle
http://my.cityu.edu




About Hybrid Courses

Your instructor will provide you with login instructions and a demonstration on Blackboard.

Hybrid Definition
At City University of Seattle a hybrid course is a blend of classroom and Internet (online) delivered instruction. This type of instruction uses the best aspects of both online and traditional face-to-face classrooms. At City University of Seattle this means that at least 51% of the course contact hours are delivered in the classroom supplemented by no more than 49% of online activities, delivered through the Internet using the Blackboard learning management system.

Hybrid Course Delivery Format
This course has been approved as a hybrid course, meaning that three credit hours of the class will be spent in the classroom and two hours of credit will be awarded for online activities. Online activities will consist of weekly discussion questions and two online examinations. Since you will be meeting together in the classroom, you will have the opportunity to become acquainted with each other and can use the Discussion Board for discussions.

Overview of Course Activities and Grading

The grade you receive for the course will be derived using City University of Seattle’s decimal grading system, based on the following:

Assignments

Discussion Assignments 10%
Essays (2@10%) 20%
Research Paper 25%
Online Examination 15%
Final Examination 30%

TOTAL 100%

Please see the current City University of Seattle catalog or consult your instructor for guidance in determining your decimal grade.

Explanation of Assignments and Grading

Discussion Assignments

A discussion question or topic from your instructor appears weekly in the Discussion Board. You are to post your answer as well as a response to two other student’s responses in the Discussion Forum by the end of each session. The forum is to help promote student to student discussion. The instructor may not respond to each posting. If you have a question or comment that is specifically for your instructor, email your instructor directly or use the Question and Answer Forum. If you want to talk with other students about issues unrelated to the discussion forums, use the Coffee Talk Forum.

Although the tone of your discussion board postings can be informal, your instructor will expect the content to be on a professional level. In other words, your comments and questions for discussion should be clear and thoughtful, with correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation. As with written assignments, the quality of your discussion postings will be graded on both content and presentation.

Grading Criteria for Discussion Assignment

Promptness of response 10%
Degree of participation (at least three postings per
week) 30%
Thoughtfulness of response 60%

TOTAL 100%

Essay #1—ANALYZING AND JUSTIFYING PERSONAL ETHICS

This essay has two parts – a questionnaire, twenty mini-essays. Further information may be found this way: Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on the link at the top called ‘Essay #1’.

Essay #2—ETHICAL THEORIES

This essay involves applying ethical theories to social problems. Further information may be found this way: Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on the link at the top called ‘Essay #2’.

Grading Criteria for Essays

Logical organization 15%
Application of philosophical terms and concepts 20%
Thoughtfulness of the answers 55%
Proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, and syntax 10%

TOTAL 100%
Research Paper

Select a book and analyze the ethical universe in which it has has been written. You will have to deduce some of the various aspects of this universe while other aspects may be acknowledged in the text itself. (Your instructor will be providing examples of this type of analysis throughout the course.)

Begin doing some preliminary reading for your paper early in the quarter. During the sixth week of the course, you will post to the discussion board a proposal for your research essay. The proposal should suggest your topic, propose a tentative thesis, and give your instructor some idea of how you intend to research and develop your thesis.

For guidance in how to prepare a research paper, consult The Brief New Century Handbook.

As you prepare your research paper you also will want to be mindful of the following guidelines:

• Your topic must be related to the course of study and must be approved by your instructor.

• You must cite the sources of all ideas, facts and information used that are not your own, even if you have put the information into your own words. Failure to do so is plagiarism, even if the oversight is unintentional. See The Brief New Century Handbook for a detailed explanation of proper APA author-page documentation format.

• Supporting your thesis is central to the task of writing a research paper. In scholarly writing, you are not merely copying information from another author, but using evidence to support the contentions drawn from your findings and critical analysis of related literature.

• Your research paper must be word-processed, double-spaced, with 11- or 12-point font and one-inch margins. It should be at least eight pages long and incorporate references to a minimum of five sources in addition to your text.

• You must retain at least one copy of your research paper in case the first copy is lost or misplaced. We recommend that you also retain your research notes and rough drafts so that if a question arises as to an actual source and its location, you will be able to address that question in a timely manner.

Grading Criteria for Research Paper

Appropriate format 5%
Clear objectives and thesis 10%
Logical development of body and thesis 45%
Proper grammar, spelling, syntax, and punctuation 10%
Sufficient depth of research 15%
Appropriate reference methods and reporting 15%

TOTAL 100%
Online Examination
Your first examination in this hybrid course will be taken online. It may consist of objective questions (true/false, multiple choice), essay questions, or a mixture of these. Your instructor will give you additional information about the exam coverage and format.
Final Examination

The final examination for this course will be taken in class. Your instructor will advise you about the exam format and coverage.

Grading Criteria for Essay Questions on Examinations

Clear grasp of major issues posed by the question 20%
Valid arguments; appropriate supportive detail 20%
Appropriate analysis, evaluation and synthesis 20%
Demonstrated ability to employ terms, concepts, and frames of reference from texts, lectures, and other course materials
20%
Proper organization and logical flow of responses 20%

TOTAL 100%
Recommended Course Schedule

The schedule for course activities and assignments is below. If you find you are unable to complete the assignments as scheduled, contact your instructor. Your instructor may elect to adjust the outline to meet the unique needs of the class.

Session Topics and Assignments Readings

1



Anti-philosophical approach text: Thus spoke Zarathustra

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following links: “Nietzsche” and “Conscience”

2

‘Non-complex society’ approach text: The Politics

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following link: “Aristotle”

3

Political approach texts: Second Treatise and Discourse on Inequality

Online Examination
DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following links: “Locke” and “Rousseau”

4

‘Complex society’ approach text: Philosophy of Right

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses
Essay #1 Due

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following link: “Hegel”

5

Anti-revolutionary approach text: Reflections on the Revolution in France

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses
DUE: Essay #1

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following links: “Burke I” and “Burke II”

6

Legal approach text:

DUE: Proposal for research paper
DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses


Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following link: “Heath”

7
Medical issues:

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses
Essay #2 Due

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following link: “Barber”
Session Topics and Assignments Readings

8

Environmental &
Business issues

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following links: “Keynes” and “McDonald’s I” and “McDonald’s history” and “Enron I” and “Lay obituary”

9

Love, sexuality and intimacy issues

DUE: Discussion question/topic posting & responses

Please type what follows exactly following into your browser http://ellmann0.tripod.com/id102.html and then click on, and read, the following link: “Kinsey” and “Chaos of love” and “Is marriage dead?”


10

Final Examination (in class)
DUE BEFORE TAKING EXAM: Research paper




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